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Hope in Sudan as Abdalla Hamdok becomes first civilian Prime Minister

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Hope in Sudan as Abdalla Hamdok becomes first civilian Prime Minister

The African Union and the Mo Ibrahim Foundation are among many others who have welcomed the appointment of Abdalla Hamdok as the civilian Prime Minister of the transitional government of Sudan.

Following the signing of the power-sharing constitutional decree on 17 August 2019, both sides in the protracted Sudanese crisis agreed on the appointment of Abdalla Hamdok, who will lead the country to civilian rule.

As messages of  goodwill poured in, on Saturday  24 August, Hamdock told Reuters that Sudan needs $8 billion in foreign aid over the next two years if it is to rebuild its  ravaged economy.  

“This historic achievement is the culmination of months of negotiations and the result of the steadfast and peaceful resolve of the Sudanese people, especially the women and Youth, for a democratic transition in Sudan,” said Moussa Faki Mahamat, Chairperson of the African Union Commission.

The Africa Union – which had suspended Sudan in June – following the deaths of scores of protestors at the hands of the then interim ruling military council ( following the form of former strongman Omar al-Bashir) – said it will remain steadfast and continue its commitment to support “Sudanese people in their pursuit towards a democratic Sudan.”

This historic achievement is the culmination of months of negotiations and the result of the steadfast and peaceful resolve of the Sudanese people, especially the women and Youth.

Meanwhile, Mo Ibrahim – the Sudanese business mogul and vehement critic of the former government and the ousted al-Bashir – also welcomed the new appointment of the prime minister and the political developments in his country.

“Sudan is at a critical turning point in its history. What has been achieved is amazing and showcases the ability of a committed civil society, led by women and youth, supported by continental and regional institutions, to achieve a peaceful and democratic transition. We must now all commit to the sustainability of this success, key for the whole continent,” he said in a statement released through his Mo Ibrahim Foundation.

“I am also happy to see two women as members of the Sovereign Council, including one representative of the Coptic Christian minority. I hope that more young people and women will take an active part in the new government. We wish Abdalla Hamdok all the best as he steps up to his new position and the important task at hand,” he added.

The Foundation, said the statement, recognises Abdalla Hamdok’s unwavering commitment to upholding standards for wise leadership and sound governance in Africa throughout his career…[and] “We support his vow to prioritise economic prosperity and build a lasting peace across the country.”

“Democratic civilian rule is the only way to ensure sustainable good governance, shared by and for all the people of Sudan. The pursuit of an inclusive dialogue between all parties and effective support from the international community will be essential to the success and sustainability of this transition, “ the statement further reads.

We support his vow to prioritise economic prosperity and build a lasting peace across the country.

For the past 6 years, Hamdok has been the Chair of the Ibrahim Index of African Governance (IIAG) Advisory Council. A renown and respected economist, one of Hamdock’s early and main task will be to name a 20-member Cabinet. He only has 21 days to do so and his choices could affect the fragile transition to lasting peace.

“We will have a plan that will address the immediate challenges through our recovery program, addressing the felt need by the people, “he said during his swearing-in ceremony in the capital Khartoum on Wednesday 21 August.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Written by Regina Jane Jere

reGina Jane Jere is a Zambian-born London-based journalist and founding Editor of the New African Woman magazine the sister-publication of the New African magazine of which she was the Deputy Editor for over a decade. The mother of two juggles a wide-range of editorial and managerial duties, but she has particular passion on women’s health, education, rights and empowerment. She is also a former Zambian correspondent for Agence France Presse, and a former Africa Researcher at Index on Censorship. She writes extensively on a wide range of issues, from politics to women’s rights, media and free speech to beauty and fashion.

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